incoherence


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Related to incoherence: elicited

incoherence

[‚in·kō′hir·əns]
(medicine)
Lack of coherence, relevance, or continuity of ideas or language.
References in classic literature ?
And here the incoherence coming on very strong, Mrs Varden wept, and laughed, and sobbed, and shivered, and hiccoughed, and choked; and said she knew it was very foolish but she couldn't help it; and that when she was dead and gone, perhaps they would be sorry for it--which really under the circumstances did not appear quite so probable as she seemed to think--with a great deal more to the same effect.
I was much impressed by her allusion to Richard and by the sad meaning, so sadly illustrated in her poor pinched form, that made its way through all her incoherence.
She had believed in a spiritual light burning steadily and steadfastly behind the erratic disorder and incoherence of life.
There seemed to be at once a little stability in all this incoherence.
Whiskers growled an incoherence deep in his throat and spat into the fire in token that he was not pleased by the question.
He has accompanied this incoherence with some wild unmeaning gestures; but they trail off into the progressive inaction of stupor, and he lies a log upon the bed.
Receiving an encouraging answer, she condensed the narrative of her life into a few scanty words about herself and a glowing eulogy upon her father; and Flora took it all in with a natural tenderness that quite understood it, and in which there was no incoherence.
He had simply babbled on uttering empty phrases, letting slip a few enigmatic words and again reverting to incoherence.
The occupation is often full of interest and he who attempts it for the first time is astonished by the apparently illimitable distance and incoherence between the starting-point and the goal.
We thus respond to contemporary incoherence by using the study of language to instill a sense of origins.
Jarry also published stories, novels, and poems, but the brilliant imagery and wit of these works usually lapse into incoherence and a meaningless and often scatological symbolism.
In this context, critical claims of incoherence can be seen, at least in part, as a result of a reader's desire to drink old wine from old bottles, to expect, based on earlier works, "an angle of vision that was no longer acceptable to the author" (p.