incomplete abortion


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incomplete abortion

[‚in·kəm′plēt ə′bȯr·shən]
(medicine)
Expulsion of only part of the product of conception, with some of the membranes or placenta remaining in the uterus.
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Most of the staff of the emergency unit still needed to improve their clinical skills since many of them could not perform the first examination of an incomplete abortion.
Significantly, the term "postabortion care" was dropped as the protocols appear largely within guidelines for managing bleeding in pregnancy, which is a primary complication of incomplete abortion.
Failure to return or to follow your physician's orders may result in an incomplete abortion or continued pregnancy, a need for surgery, severe bleeding, severe pelvic pain or other dangerous complications.
Women were eligible for the study if they were admitted to one of the hospitals with a diagnosis of incomplete abortion (determined by ultrasonography and clinical examination), did not have severe complications requiring immediate treatment and had an estimated gestational age of up to 18 weeks.
21) Recent research has shown, however, that with high-resolution ultrasound and careful examination of the products of conception, early surgical abortions can be performed without an elevated risk of ectopic pregnancy or incomplete abortion, (22) and that an increasing number of providers perform such early abortions.
While the costs of medical supplies for legal abortion at secondary and tertiary facilities ($21-22; Table 2) were similar to the corresponding costs of treating incomplete abortion at these facilities ($18-19; Table 1), labor costs were more than twice as high ($168-191 vs.
With every incomplete abortion, there is the possibility of the sort of retained fetal tissue that led to the septic infection in Holly Patterson's case.
The study's objectives were to establish the number of admissions for abortion-related complications at 17 major hospitals in all regions of Namibia; the number of Dilatation and Curettage (D&C) procedures performed (these are often done to remove the remains of an incomplete abortion from the uterus); the number of abortion-related maternal deaths and their causes; and finally the perspectives of health workers and hospitalised women on abortion.
The World Health Organization estimates that between 10 and 50 percent of all women who undergo unsafe abortions need medical care for complications, the most frequent of which are incomplete abortion, infection, hemorrhage and injury to the internal organs.
In addition, trained providers need constant access to the tools that are critical for reducing maternal mortality: short- and long-term contraceptive methods for the prevention of unwanted pregnancy, misoprostol for treatment of postpartum hemorrhage, and manual vacuum aspiration and misoprostol for the treatment of incomplete abortion.
The second intervention was the introduction of manual vacuum aspiration as an outpatient procedure, using local anaesthesia, as an alternative means of treating incomplete abortion, which could also be provided by midwives.
The more tissue present, the higher the success rate; surgical intervention is less often needed for embryonic or fetal demise and incomplete abortion than for anembryonic gestations.