incompressible fluid

incompressible fluid

[¦in·kəm′pres·ə·bal ′flü·əd]
(fluid mechanics)
A fluid which is not reduced in volume by an increase in pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Since the pipe was filled with sarin, which is an incompressible fluid, as the pipe was flattened, the sarin acted on the walls and ends of the pipe causing a crack along the length of the pipe and also the failure of the cap on the back end."
The homogeneous Partial Differential Equation (PDE) governing the flow-induced vibration of a pipeline conveying an incompressible fluid is given by
[18] presented the combined effect of joule heating and viscous dissipation and on a viscous incompressible fluid and over an inclined radiate isothermal permeable surface.
Furthermore, to justify the hypotheses of the proposed statistics, the theoretical results of this latter are compared with numerical simulations of a proper differential system representing the incompressible fluid kinematics.
Considering the flow an incompressible fluid of second grade, the boundary value problem can be solved even when the inertial effects are included.
The hydrostatic transmission system converts mechanical energy into pressure energy by the incompressible fluid, which is further converted into mechanical energy at the output shaft.
To evaluate shear viscosity in tube (or capillary) flow, an incompressible fluid must undergo steady pressure-driven flow in the laminar regime.
In the first part of the project, a correct modelling framework will be set up including suitable equations to describe the flow of an incompressible fluid through the device and an appropriate model to represent the membrane filtration process.
Raithby, "Enhancements of the SIMPLE Method for predicting incompressible fluid flows," Numerical Heat Transfer, PartB: Fundamentals, vol.
Laminar Flow of Non-Newtonian Incompressible Fluid. The flow of a non-Newtonian incompressible fluid is governed by the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations as follows:
Later chapters study the structure of velocity fields for two-dimensional incompressible fluid flows governed by the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations.
This book considers the range of mathematical, engineering, and computer science topics that form the foundation of high-order numerical methods for the simulation of incompressible fluid flows in complex domains.