incongruous

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incongruous

[in′käŋ·grü·əs]
(geology)
Of a drag fold, having an axis and axial surface not parallel to the axis and axial surface of the main fold to which it is related.
References in classic literature ?
I remember once having the incongruity of the relation brought home to me in a practical way.
Although there was much incongruity in the furniture and appearance of the hall, there was nothing mean.
His lamp was not lit, and as her large, grave face gazed at him through the light dusk from under the shadow of her ample bonnet, he felt the incongruity of such a person presenting herself as a servant.
The play of the white gleams of his smile round the suspicion of grimness of his tone fascinated me like a moral incongruity.
The incongruity between the masquerade and the mystery had created a curious psychological atmosphere.
He laid down a gory yellow "shocker" without even feeling its incongruity enough to comment on it humorously.
To Tess's sense there was, just at first, a ghastly BIZARRERIE, a grim incongruity, in the march of these solemn words of Scripture out of such a mouth.
He was exhilarated by the scene, the funny little man in his odd clothes, the panelled room and the Spanish furniture, the English fare: the whole thing had an exquisite incongruity.
His slightly stooped shoulders were draped in an ill-fitting, though immaculate, frock coat, and a shiny silk hat added to the incongruity of his garb in an African jungle.
It appeared to stand out in marked contrast and incongruity to all its surroundings, and when I stopped to examine it, I found that it was a small strip of muslin--part of the hem of a garment.
He smiled bitterly at the incongruity of it, and was assailed by doubts.
We can only guess why the great design was abandoned; perhaps because Plato became sensible of some incongruity in a fictitious history, or because he had lost his interest in it, or because advancing years forbade the completion of it; and we may please ourselves with the fancy that had this imaginary narrative ever been finished, we should have found Plato himself sympathizing with the struggle for Hellenic independence, singing a hymn of triumph over Marathon and Salamis, perhaps making the reflection of Herodotus where he contemplates the growth of the Athenian empire--"How brave a thing is freedom of speech, which has made the Athenians so far exceed every other state of Hellas in greatness