incorporate

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incorporate

[in′kȯr·pə‚rāt]
(computer science)
To place in storage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless, through incorporative memories, children learn values and customs not only from their family, but also from the broader social environment as well (Koch, Fuchs, and Summa).
Foe, then, is the heart just prior to its reception of the secret of Christianity as incorporative process: illuminating an anterior erasure, Coetzee's theft (the Christian colonizer's theft no longer secret) becomes a gift to the reader.
The planners' role, limited in scope, could be incorporative of either or both the outcome or the process of decision making as asserted by communicative action theorists (Forrester, 1989)
63) The Army Medical Museum inverts incorporative mourning processes, creating a space where the detached object is kept dead, and externalized.
151) This can only result in a more incorporative and democratic policy-making process for the international community.
This drive in turn abstracts local culture from the particularities of the field site and submits it to the integrative dynamics of the incorporative (American) state--the ultimate, political expression of pantopia.
Gail Ching-Liang Low writes that 'the nineteenth-century naturalisation of geological and evolutionary time, whilst deceptively incorporative in its universal applicability, was in fact founded on difference and separation' (Low, 1996: 24).
These incorporative approaches include two-way communication between teachers and students, and school environments in which students are responsible for their own behaviour and share the same rights and responsibilities as their teachers.
Performance itself, as Butler notes, could be intensively related to "the problem of unacknowledged loss," meaning that gender performance "allegorizes a loss it cannot grieve, allegorizes the incorporative fantasy of melancholia whereby an object is phantasmatically taken in or on as a way of refusing to let it go" (Butler 1993: 234-35).
As Butler indicates, "[G]ender performance allegorizes a loss it cannot grieve, allegorizes the incorporative fantasy of melancholia whereby an object is phantasmatically taken in or on as a way of refusing to let it go" (235).
These developments, coupled with a resurgence of Brahmanical authority and the emergence of the Sanskrit Puranas, signal for the authors the advent of a broadly incorporative, pan-Indian "Hinduism.
Instead, I argue that efforts to include or exclude Indians from jurisdictional space can serve as a barometer of different colonial approaches to power over people, one incorporative and aggressive in its assertion of sovereignty through jurisdiction, the other using military force to police subordinate, but autonomous, Indian polities.