incorporeal


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incorporeal

1. spiritual or metaphysical
2. Law having no material existence but existing by reason of its annexation of something material, such as an easement, touchline, copyright, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incorporeal means without a physical body, presence or form.
"As our ancestors lived close to the land, we now live close to innumerable, incorporeal governmental agencies that shape our behavior," he writes in the book's introduction.
American Zionists focused less on manly muscular bodies, Imhoff argues, and more on incorporeal traits like courage to show that American Jews' fell outside of the feminized diaspora.
And because I focused on such clear objects before, I think I am now interested in images of more incorporeal things, such as the colour spot on the retina that's left after you look at the sun [in Weisse Sonne; Fig.
In Judaism, the divine presence is abstract, incorporeal, without beginning or end.
Somehow, the concept of incorporeal figures that vaguely represent some hypothetical entity of unknown origin escapes me, I suppose, but it was not the lack of understanding that gave me a distaste for numbers.
The main criticism of such evidence has been that it cannot represent the "intent" of the legislature, an incorporeal body, but that is equally true of other forms of legislative history.
"At common law an easement is defined as a nonpossessory incorporeal interest in another's possessory estate in land, entitling the holder of the easement to make some use of the other's property."
The rich Hindu articulations of such images offer, Goshen-Gottstein suggests, points of deep spiritual resonance with the Hassidic emphasis on the cultivation of the imagination for meditatively envisioning, however falteringly, the incorporeal God.
The "Timescape" paintings might sometimes evoke the incorporeal surfaces of Jules Olitski or even Ad Reinhardt's Black Paintings, whose colors unfold slowly from pitch-black to reveal subtle chromatic sections; their edges, however, have a more conceptual, or "nominalist," nature, as if meant to list all the colors used to realize the surface.