incurable

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incurable

1. (esp of a disease) not curable; unresponsive to treatment
2. a person having an incurable disease
References in periodicals archive ?
They are shown in Figure 1, with mean acceptability ratings pooled across levels of incurability and types of suffering.
It equals the proportional reduction in the cancer's rate/probability of incurability, or in its case-fatality rate, attendant to its detection under the screening, when not considering whether the diagnosis is due to the screening or to symptoms emerging between two successively scheduled rounds of the screening.
Because on a weekend in which The X Factor's obsession with returning old faces appeared to have reached fresh levels of incurability, the oldest face in showbiz came back to once more haunt poor Simon's dreams.
Patients are always worried that they're going to progress to incurability while they're being observed.
Palliative care providers carry out varied caregiving roles, one of which can involve telling a patient and their family about the incurability of an illness (telling bad news).
Oxidants, antioxidants and the current Incurability of metastatic cancers.
Ferdiere's formulation poses the problem of incurability in terms of semantic instability by relating it to the concept of the exceptional being: Artaud's exceptionality is that which blurs the semantic boundaries between mental health and illness.
In this section we explore countermeasures and mitigation techniques for some of these attacks, and point out technical reasons behind incurability of other attacks.
In the first third, the authors discuss at length the inimical misconceptions and myths surrounding schizophrenia, namely incurability, chronicity, endogenous, and erroneous belief of synonymy of absence of treatment and well-being.
In spite of the significant increase in survival rates, pediatric cancer is still usually associated to a social representation of death, incurability, losses, and intense suffering (Rodrigues, Rosa, Moura, & Baptista, 2000).
The central point of the film is, in fact, the incurability and slow progression of the illness which has infected Brigitte's blood.