indelible ink


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indelible ink

[in′del·ə·bəl ′iŋk]
(materials)
An ink that cannot be removed, for example, India ink.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comelec Resolution 10460 states that the indelible ink should be applied on a voter's right forefinger nail, except in cases where the voter has no nail on his or her right forefinger.
However, other reports have previously indicated that a 5ml indelible ink marker pen can mark up to 600 voters while a 100ml dipping bottle can mark up to 1000 voters.
They also complained of insufficient supply of indelible ink and stamp pads.
Recent news reports from India said the EC had ordered 100,000 bottles of indelible ink worth RM4.8 million for GE14.
The EC has ordered 100,000 bottles of indelible ink from India's Mysore Paints and Varnish, the company was reported as saying by the Deccan Herald newspaper on Sunday.
Given it is a round trip of well over 400 miles from Newmarket to the Teesside circuit, it is no surprise the leading trainer's raids have been so infrequent, yet Indelible Ink makes the long journey north on the horsebox alone.
NEWMAREKT 5.55 Secret Success 6.30 Ganges 7.05 Indelible Ink 7.35 Argot 8.05 Life Partner 8.40 Gold Struck 9.10 War Spirit.
NEWMARKET: NEWMARKET: 5.55 Secret Success, 6.30 Ganges, 7.05 Indelible Ink, 7.35 Argot, 8.05 Life Partner, 8.40 Gold Struck, Indelible Ink, 7.35 Argot, 8.05 Life Partner, 8.40 Gold Struck, 9.10 War Spirit.
The 11 men, mostly elders, were seized by insurgents after they had voted in the election and got their index fingers dipped in indelible ink mutilated.
A tattoo is a form of body modification, made by inserting indelible ink into the dermis layer of the skin to change the pigment and is a custom and practice reaching back into antiquity.
"We strongly reject the accusation that Barisan Nasional stoked racial divisions," the spokesman said, "There were some issues with the indelible ink. However, we must stress that it is one of three safeguards, and we have yet to see any evidence that voters who had been inked were able to vote again.
Bersih 2.0, a coalition of non-governmental groups, had organised the rally demanding electoral reforms such as the introduction of indelible ink to prevent people casting multiple votes and equal access for all political parties to the mainstream media.