inderite

inderite

[′in·də‚rīt]
(mineralogy)
Mg2B6O11·15H2O A hydrated borate mineral.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects of different nonisothermal kinetic methods on the thermal dehydration of inderite were examined by Zhu et al.
In literature, despite the extensively reported synthesis of magnesium borates, only inderite minerals' kinetic behavior has been studied.
Figen, "Dehydroxylation Reaction Kinetic Mechanism of Inderite Mineral,' IPCBEE, vol.
Piskin, The Evaluation of the Neutron Radiation Absorption Capacities of Inderite Minerals, vol.
Other specimens are subject to partial degradation; for example, kurnakovite and inderite crystals will turn white on their exteriors in response to air pollution near cities like Los Angeles.
Further to the letter in the July-August issue by Ben Grguric (concerning mineral specimen mortality): In 1961 I returned from Boron, California with four hand-size specimens of inderite. I soaked them in water to remove the soft clay from around the delicate 1-inch crystals, then placed them out by a Joshua tree to dry.
Other less attractive but interesting species include bismuth minerals (native bismuth, bismuthinite, cosalite, bismutite), tungsten minerals (scheelite, ferberite) and several borates including ludwigite in large, radiated masses, inderite, szaibelyite and canavesite-a species described in 1978 for which Brosso is the type and, so far, only locality.