indicolite


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indicolite

[in′dik·ə‚līt]
(mineralogy)
An indigo-blue variety of tourmaline that is used as a gemstone. Also known as indigolite.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sapo mine is managed by Martins Clovis Coelho, nicknamed "Baiano." For some time of late the mine has been producing specimens which show crystals of blue tourmaline ("indicolite") resting on and intergrown with quartz crystals both of the colorless and of the citrine variety.
I was already on my way to Brazil in January of 2008 when Baiano informed me in a phone call that his mine was again yielding indicolite tourmaline, "cathedral" quartz and many associated minerals.
About 20% of the indicolite is of the finest gem quality, and it is these crystals that make the mine economically viable; even so, it is an enormous effort to meet all expenses and still show a profit.
It was a little fist-sized opening that contained only one tourmaline, a poorly formed crystal of about an inch by 1.5 inches of medium-blue indicolite. Viewing it in the sunlight I caught a gleam of reflective light that signaled cat's-eye.
When we were just a few feet beyond the indicolite mini-pocket, we began removing huge gobs of damp red clay that filled broad fractures between disjointed boulders of the core zone pegmatite.
Slowly, the layers of harder pocket components that had coated and hidden most of the crystals were worn away, revealing a unique matrix specimen--a pale pink beryl measuring 1.4 by 1.75 inches, attached to matrix supporting an array of colorful pink tourmaline crystals, all with indicolite rinds and terminations, some of them up to 0.4 inches thick.
Two 0.4-inch crystals in this pocket started their growth about an inch and a half apart, one a classic blue-cap elbaite, and the other with a pink base that transforms mid-way into a pure blue indicolite. Its blue termination butts into the upper section of the blue-cap forming a sort of tilted "A" frame, making altogether a spectacular matrix arrangement.
Little by little the adit was cleared to the area where the indicolite had been found.
The Golconda mine, near Governador Valadares, has produced a pocket of gemmy, plumose, brush-like indicolite crystals (to 8 x 2 cm).
In Kazakhstan the Kalban district has produced some fine bicolored green-red tourmalines as well as rare, flawless indicolites to 5 cm.