Indifference

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Indifference

Antoinette, Marie
(1755–1793) queen of France to whom is attributed this statement on the solution to bread famine: “Let them eat cake.” [Fr. Hist.: NCE, 1696]
Bastienne
unsuccessful ploy to win back Bastien. [Ger. Opera: Mozart, Bastien and Bastienne, Westerman, 83]
Defarge, Madame
feigned indifference; knitted while executions were taking place. [Br. Lit.: A Tale of Two Cities]
Laodicean
inhabitant of ancient Greek city, Laodicea; people noted for indifferent attitude toward religion. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 1529]
Nero
(37–68) Roman Emperor who is reported to have fiddled while Rome burned. [Rom. Hist.: Misc.]
New York City
often thought of as a metropolis of cold, uncaring people. [Pop. Culture: Misc.]
Oblomov
passed life in torpor; symbolically, died sleeping. [Russ. Lit.: Oblomov]
senvy
indicates apathy and noncaring. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 177]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"A great politician." Aramis made a gesture of indifference.
This long series of surprises increased the mistrust of D'Artagnan, as the eternal indifference of D'Artagnan provoked the suspicions of Aramis.
Maggie gave the tips of her fingers, and said, "Quite well, thank you," in a tone of proud indifference. Philip's eyes were watching them keenly; but Lucy was used to seeing variations in their manner to each other, and only thought with regret that there was some natural antipathy which every now and then surmounted their mutual good-will.
you have made me so unhappy with your indifference. Oh!
He seemed continually to be searching for someone, and during the first days of the return voyage from the island he was often discovered nosing about in various parts of the ship; but after he had seen and examined each face of the ship's company, and explored every corner of the vessel he lapsed into utter indifference of all about him.
The sisters, on hearing this, repeated three or four times how much they were grieved, how shocking it was to have a bad cold, and how excessively they disliked being ill themselves; and then thought no more of the matter: and their indifference towards Jane when not immediately before them restored Elizabeth to the enjoyment of all her former dislike.
If there had been a number of babies before he took it for the most part with surly indifference, but if newly married he was nervous and then sometimes strove to allay his anxiety by getting drunk.