indirection


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indirection

(programming)
Manipulating data via its address. Indirection is a powerful and general programming technique. It can be used for example to process data stored in a sequence of consecutive memory locations by maintaining a pointer to the current item and incrementing it to point to the next item.

Indirection is supported at the machine language level by indirect addressing. Many processor and operating system architectures use vectors which are also an instance of indirection, being locations which hold the address of a routine to handle a particular event. The event handler can be changed simply by pointing the vector at a new piece of code.

C includes operators "&" which returns the address of a variable and its inverse "*" which returns the variable at a given address.

indirection

Not direct. Indirection provides a way of accessing instructions, routines and objects when their physical location is constantly changing. The initial routine points to some place, and, using hardware and/or software, that place points to some other place. There can be multiple levels of indirection. For example, point to A, which points to B, which points to C. See indirect address.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as a military with a doctrine that emphasizes maneuver and indirection needs an organizational structure that is decentralized, has low levels of standardization, and has high levels of horizontal integration, it needs an organizational culture that values initiative, innovation and creativity, adaptability and flexibility, and risk-taking.
As shown in Figure 7, the program flash stores the main program (.text section), EasiLIR runtime system, and the indirection table.
If Aphoria coheres, it does so by indirection, which makes judging the book's accomplishment tough.
Such "indirection" informed his insistence on many takes.
Here the shifting indirection of the imagery achieves an intimacy with the natural world through quick, visual accuracies.
In an essay on this topic in a not-widely-disseminated anthology published in the year of his death, (3) Spohn described what he called the grace of indirection as the fundamental way in which the arts can help shape our moral imaginations.
She aims by such indirection to suggest unconvincingly that he was sympathetic to Church reform.
He opens his critique with a high-pitched evocation of every parent's nightmare (and just for the record the authors have children of their own and understand the depths of his feeling) and then proceeds by indirection, rhetorical sleight of hand and a few indulgent displays of dubious relevance to excoriate our liberal if not moral failure in choosing a measured analysis over oracular denunciation.
Rather, the narrator of this epic takes on the attributes of his wily, devious hero, who has a penchant for disguises, false leads, coded messages, underhanded-ness, and indirection. The defense has created an alternative theory of the situation, one that not only takes into account several key pieces of evidence unnoticed or passed over by the legendary commentator but also creates a more plausible explanation for what actually does happen and is said than the traditional wisdom can account for.
The figures show that for every pounds 27,000 salaried job created, the taxpayer gains by pounds 13,000 as a result of reduced benefit payments and the increased direct and indirection taxes paid by people in work.
Signs function for interpretation and proclamation not least of all, because they often work by indirection. Strategies of indirection are well-illustrated in the case study that runs throughout the book to animate and give concretness to Nieman's theory.
In order to persuade President Abbas to agree to "indirection negotiations," the White House was forced to include in its document, "We expect both parties to act seriously and in good faith.