induced fission

induced fission

[in′düst ′fish·ən]
(nuclear physics)
Fission which takes place only when a nucleus is bombarded with neutrons, gamma rays, or other carriers of energy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mutual effects between spontaneous fission neutrons and gamma rays from [sup.252]Cf source and the uranium component are chiefly in three possible processes: penetration, scattering, and induced fission. Then the neutrons and gamma rays are detected and recorded by the detector.
(d) corresponds to the scattered neutrons, the neutrons, and gamma rays from induced fission that are detected lately (e).
Moussa, "An observation on the effect of environmental conditions on induced fission of the Mediterranean sand sea cucumber, Holothuria arenicola (Semper, 1868) in Egypt," SPC Beche de Mer Information Bulletin, vol.
The Brightsen Model offers a theoretical approach for artificially induced fission of dangerous radioactive nuclei to produce relatively stable elements [5].
These products include neutrons that may be emitted over periods ranging from nanoseconds to many seconds, whether as a result of spontaneous fission or of fission induced by gamma rays or neutrons, and gamma rays emitted within nanoseconds of induced fission.
In 1938, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann used slow neutrons to effect the first experimentally induced fission of uranium.