induction field

induction field

[in′dək·shən ‚fēld]
(electromagnetism)
A component of an electromagnetic field associated with an alternating current in a loop, coil, or antenna which carries energy alternately away from and back into the source, with no net loss, and which is responsible for self-inductance in a coil or mutual inductance with neighboring coils.
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Kitchens, - various thermal devices, - various refrigerated cabinets, - 1 hood push-through dishwasher, - 1 water softening system, - 2 stainless steel exhaust hoods, - 1 drinking water dispenser teaching kitchen consisting of: About 15 meters of stainless steel furniture, - 2 refrigerators, - 1 freezer the following devices in the household standard: - 2 induction field / oven combinations, - 2 self-sufficient induction fields, - 4 fume hoods, - 2 built-in dishwashers, - 1 drinking water dispenser.
The neoclassical causal version for Newtonian gravitational theory requires a hypothetical induction field [F.
In addition, Sony confirmed its TransferJet Coupler is based on electric induction field coupling to deliver improved propagation performance in comparison to conventional radiation field based antennas.
Sony's newly developed "TransferJet Coupler" is based on electric induction field coupling to deliver superior propagation performance compared to conventional radiation field based antennas.
To soften water, the chemical- and salt-free Aqua-Tron sold by Energy Efficient Environments ($299) uses an induction field, which also removes mineral build-up and extends appliance life.
For the WCB/8630, no significant effect was shown since adequate coupling to the induction field was achieved.
The correct temperature is a function of the mass of the rod end, inductor energy output, and the time the rod is in the induction field.
Rindler's popular textbook Essential Relativity [4], Rindler derives the formulas for the time-retarded scalar potential [phi], the time-retarded "gravitoelectric" acceleration field e, the time-retarded vector potential a, and the time-retarded "gravitomagnetic" induction field h.
Although the slag is not heated by the induction field, supplemental heating by plasma torch or oxy-fuel burner can produce a highly reactive, fluid slag to facilitate refining.
The circulating current, in turn, produces the magnetic induction field *
Entrapped metal in a high-energy induction field can easily reach the failure temperature (melting point) of the refractory material.
In addition, the fiber optic cable can survive ambient exposures up to 400[degrees]F (200[degrees]C), and with Teflon jacket protection it will survive very harsh environments of dirt, smoke, water and oils, plus it is immune to induction fields (EMI).