inductive interference

inductive interference

[in′dək·tiv ‚in·tər′fir·əns]
(communications)
Effect arising from the characteristics and inductive relations of electric supply and communications systems of such character and magnitude as would prevent the communications circuits from rendering service satisfactorily and economically if methods of inductive coordination were not applied.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inductive interference is the dominant interference mechanism under normal power line conditions.
In the case of inductive interference, gradient control wires provide additional grounding for the pipeline, decreasing the induced pipe potential rise.