inductively coupled plasma discharge

inductively coupled plasma discharge

[in′dək·tiv·lē ¦kəp·əld ′plaz·mə ′dis‚chärj]
(plasma physics)
A high-temperature (8000-10,000 K) discharge generated by inducing a magnetic field in a flowing conducting gas, usually argon or argon and nitrogen, by means of a water-cooled copper coil which surrounds tubes through which the gas flows.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the inductively coupled plasma discharge used in today's spectroscopy, argon gas is directed through a torch consisting of three concentric tubes made of quartz or some other suitable material.
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