industrial conflict

industrial conflict

CONFLICTs, both overt and covert, which arise from the employment relationship and which are manifest in many different forms, from STRIKES and lockouts to time-wasting. The study of industrial conflict has involved:
  1. the classification of its different forms, e.g. visible and organized, such as strikes, or more hidden and informal, such as ‘working to rule’;
  2. study of the sources and consequences of these;
  3. consideration of the social processes by which activities actually become defined or labelled as ‘conflict’ (including media presentations of these – e.g. see GLASGOW MEDIA GROUP).

Sociology is one of several disciplines concerned with the sources, forms and consequences of both-conflict and cooperation in work organizations. As a discipline, it has in particular offered a perspective which locates the study of industrial conflict within a broad understanding of the nature of industrial societies. In this respect, the attempts of MARX, WEBER and DURKHEIM have been particularly influential and still inform discussion of industrial conflict. For example, by focusing on the way in which both formally FREE WAGE LABOUR and the espoused democratic values of capitalist societies are contradicted by the usually hierarchical nature of relations at work, sociologists have questioned those explanations of industrial conflict which either tend to offer crude psychological explanations or to regard it as simply ‘irrational’. In all, four schools of thought can be identified in the study of industrial conflict (see also INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS):

  1. ‘unitarians’, who view conflict largely as an irrational aberration;
  2. ‘pluralists’, who regard organizations as inherently conflictual, but the conflicting interests within these as amenable to, and benefitting from, mutual accommodation;
  3. ‘radical pluralists’, who explain the persistence of conflicts as arising from fundamental inequalities of power and advantage;
  4. Marxists, who ground their analysis in assumptions deriving from Marxian conceptions of EXPLOITATION and conflict. see also CONFLICT THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the Miner's Strike, an industrial conflict over the government of the day's scheming to destroy an otherwise competitive industry became a political battleground where the state deployed their full armoury to secure victory.
Given his intellectual training and milieu, it is not surprising that Arthurs adopted a critical realist perspective on the common law approach judges took to resolving industrial conflict in Canada.
There are considerable cuts in people's terms and conditions at this time and while people may reluctantly accept these, employers are creating a future where this whole cutbacks agenda will be a recipe for industrial conflict in the foreseeable future.
When Professor Kumar Bhattacharyya waded into the current Jaguar Land Rover pay row, his words re-opened, at least for some of us, a veritable Pandora's Box of industrial conflict here in the West Midlands.
However, and even before the industrial conflict spilled over into the systematic destruction of Tonypandy shops on the night of November 8, Churchill had already agreed to send on the troops assembled (200 cavalry and two infantry regiments) as far as Cardiff.
The former Labour leader is the latest protagonist from the industrial conflict to open up to ex-Plaid Cymru MP Adam Price in his S4C series about the dispute.
2009a), Labor Institutions and Labor Reforms in Contemporary India, Volume I: Trade Unions and Industrial Conflict, Icfai Press, Hyderabad.
They come as communities across the country gear up to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the start of the most bitter industrial conflict in living memory.
Churchill Services staff will again "down tools", beginning the longest spell of action in what has been a prolonged industrial conflict.
Whereas most explanations of industrial conflict in the industry have focused on the distinctive character of workers and unions, O'Leary and Sheldon examine employer strategies, ownership patterns and relations between large and smaller employers, depicting successive waves of employer strategic choice which end, as in the processes outlined by Fairbrother et al, in a period of labour flexibility, cost minimisation and individualised employment relationships, and efforts to marginalise unions and tighten workforce discipline.
INDUSTRIAL conflict remains in British workplaces despite a fall in the number of days lost through strikes, according to a new report.
On the contrary, the finer-grained secondary literature would have provided a better basis for interrogating the archival evidence and to posit welfarism as a cynical agenda for deflecting industrial conflict.

Full browser ?