industrial occupancy

industrial occupancy

1. Use of a building for the manufacture of products of any kind.
2. Use of a building for processing, assembling, mixing, packaging, finishing or decorating, repairing, and similar operations. Also see general industrial occupancy, high-hazard industrial occupancy, special-purpose industrial occupancy.
References in periodicals archive ?
New Jersey industrial occupancy and demand remain at historically high levels, especially in core submarkets along the New Jersey Turnpike.
Industrial occupancy 1 would be the level where it is less risky, meaning, the structure produces low-risk items like aerated water or bricks; while occupancy 5 means the structure produces highly combustible items like rag grinding, mattresses and pillows.
Under the category of industrial occupancy 1: cold storage and radio broadcasting are included, among others; occupancy 2 includes agriculture equipment, corn mills, distillery; occupancy 3 with alcohol, acids, rattan, rice mill, and plastics; occupancy 4 with ammonia, asphalts, adhesives; and occupancy 5, including explosives and foam, among others.
Our industrial occupancy rate is at an all-time high, and we plan to keep that momentum with this campaign.
The industrial occupancy rate for buildings in metropolitan Arkansas is improving, but still lags behind that of the nation."
Since data centers are considered an industrial occupancy, personnel comfort is not the first consideration.
According to a report last month by Colliers International, increased export volume at South Florida ports has helped industrial occupancy in the region.
The partners say the industrial occupancy rate exceeds 98 percent.
Industrial occupancy rates in Miami and Fort Lauderdale have gotten back on track, largely due to their position as port cities, according to a new report by Colliers International.
Little Rock was one of only two markets recording improved industrial occupancy among 55 markets, according to the third-quarter industrial report from Colliers International, the global real estate services firm.
A vast majority of corporate real estate executives at large corporations are planning to maintain their industrial occupancy, according to a survey conducted by CoreNet Global, a professional association of corporate real estate executives.
67% of respondents reported that their industrial portfolio will be maintained during the coming six months, while an equal number of companies (16%) plan a net increase as a net decrease in their industrial occupancy levels.

Full browser ?