inelastic buckling

inelastic buckling

[‚in·ə′las·tik ′bək·liŋ]
(mechanics)
Sudden increase of deflection or twist in a column when compressive stress reaches the elastic limit but before elastic buckling develops.
References in periodicals archive ?
These observations from the experimental studies suggest that the combined effect of inelastic buckling and nonuniform pitting corrosion results in a significant reduction in low-cycle fatigue life of corroded RC elements.
References [21-25] included a comprehensive experimental and computational study on the inelastic behaviour of isolated corroded reinforcing bars, including the impact of corrosion on inelastic buckling and degradation due to low-cycle fatigue.
Furthermore the impact of corrosion on ductility loss, reduced low-cycle fatigue life and inelastic buckling of vertical reinforcement, and corrosion induced damage to cover and core confined concrete are ignored.
2325] it is evident that the impact of corrosion on inelastic buckling, cyclic behaviour, and low-cycle fatigue degradation of reinforcing bars must be included in modelling corroded RC columns.
Prior to the development of the material models developed in [25,29], it was impossible to investigate the combined effect of corrosion damage, inelastic buckling, and low-cycle high amplitude fatigue degradation on nonlinear flexural response of corroded RC columns.
The loading capacity of these structures is closely related to the overall and local stability of thin-walled members, leading to the investigation of the elastic and inelastic buckling analysis of these members.
As to the inelastic buckling problem, Finite Element Method is the most effective way to obtain the buckling loads as well as the primary and secondary equilibrium paths of members with material and geometrical nonlinear behavior.
The analytic solution of nonlinearly inelastic buckling load is difficult to be derived because elastic and plastic zones of sections are variable along longitudinal axis of compressive member.
For the occurrence of inelastic buckling, the slenderness of the member is [lambda] = 180[micro]/3.
The primary failure mode is flexural-torsional inelastic buckling as shown in Figure 3.
Inelastic buckling of steel struts under cyclic load reversals.
20c shows the inelastic buckling mode of the inner core, which was expected as a normal response of this system because of the presence of an inner clearance of 1 mm per each side of the yielding core.