inertial flow

inertial flow

[i′nər·shəl ′flō]
(fluid mechanics)
Flow in which no external forces are exerted on a fluid.
(geophysics)
Frictionless flow in a geopotential surface in which there is no pressure gradient; the centrifugal and Coriolis accelerations must therefore be equal and opposite, and the constant inertial wind speed Vi is given by Vi = fR, where f is the Coriolis parameter and R the radius of curvature of the path.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For the fluid flow in porous media with complex structure, various flow regimes such as Darcy flow, weak inertial flow, non-Darcy flow, and turbulent flow can be identified.
Tsihrintzis, "Experimental investigation of inertial flow processes in porous media," Journal of Hydrology, vol.
The slow, inertial flow also reduces stress on the cells, resulting in more than 90 percent of viable cells with preserved multipotency.
The slow, inertial flow also reduces stress on the cells, resulting in a high percentage (more than 90 percent) of viable cells with preserved multipotency.
According to the graph, we can define the boundaries of the viscous and inertial flow regime.
When the air flow rate in a biofilter with a packing of pine cones is more than 0.4 m/s, then there is the inertial flow regime.
By managing material speed and direction, Inertial Flow transfer chutes minimize impact and wear on liners and belts, while containing dust and spillage generated at transfer points.
At other times, the engine runs less efficiently due to the inertial flow characteristics (lag) of the fuel/air charge as it moves into the cylinder.