inertial mass


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Related to inertial mass: gravitational mass

inertial mass

() See inertia; mass.

inertial mass

[i′nər·shəl ′mas]
(mechanics)
The mass of an object as determined by Newton's second law, in contrast to the mass as determined by the proportionality to the gravitational force.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both the inertial mass and cover correspond to rigid bodies and possess equal rigidity in all directions.
In this section, we show that the inertial mass of a body is its proper mass while the relativistic mass m* is in effect an effective mass or, as Dixon [6] refers to it, an apparent mass.
(2) In 1907 Plank [24] criticized the Einstein argument, and presented his own argument to show that the transfer of heat is associated with a similarly related transfer of inertial mass [7].
It has been argued that for there to be correspondence with the particle mass, perhaps at pre-quantum level, inertial mass must originate from external electromagnetic interaction [32].
For example that the inertial mass of photons is finite and varies in line with MiHsC.
This has physicists puzzled, but it could be explained if gravitational mass was not the same as inertial mass, which is a paradigm in physics.
To sum up, the inertial mass in magnetic fluid accelerometers can be one out of nonmagnetic body, magnet, or magnetic fluid.
where, respectively, m and m|prime~ are the alumiunum gravitational mass and the platinum one, whereas n and n|prime~ are the aluminium inertial mass and the platinum one.
The absorber can be completed by fixing an inertial mass near the free end of the member.
This is called the inertial mass, because the greater the mass of a body, the less acceleration a given force produces and the greater the inertia (the resistance to a change in velocity).
It features low inertial mass, crosstalk of less than 2 percent and high stiffness in both axis.
Gravity Probe A, in June 1976, was a suborbital flight of an atomic clock to test the equivalence of gravitational and inertial mass, another key element of Einstein's theory of gravity.

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