infamous

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infamous

Criminal law, formerly
a. (of a person) deprived of certain rights of citizenship on conviction of certain offences
b. (of a crime or punishment) entailing such deprivation
References in classic literature ?
Well, as long as you entertain these views, keep single by all means, and never marry at all: not even to escape the infamy of old-maidenhood.
I would not for much that she should know the infamy and disgrace of her relation
He bears no letter of infamy wrought into his garment, as thou dost, but I shall read it on his heart .
Let not the reader argue, from any of these evidences of iniquity, that the times of the Puritans were more vicious than our own, when, as we pass along the very street of this sketch, we discern no badge of infamy on man or woman.
Her glance quailed not, her cheek blanched not, for the fear of a fate so instant and so horrible; on the contrary, the thought that she had her fate at her command, and could escape at will from infamy to death, gave a yet deeper colour of carnation to her complexion, and a yet more brilliant fire to her eye.
Some passing thought of the infamy and disgrace for which it had been reserved, may have struck the prisoner's mind.
Live in Infamy explores the intricacies of power through the lenses of both the powerful and the powerless.
US President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on Climate Change 'reeks of ignorance and condemns US foreign policy into infamy,' Senator Loren Legarda said on Friday.
Nowadays there is no difference between fame and infamy.
They crave the attention and high profile that their dangerous remarks create - and banning them will only add to their media coverage and infamy.
If a tale is only as good as its villains, then noted historian and biographer Richard Reeves' Infamy, a compulsively readable, emotionally rich and passionately written account of the internment of 120,000 American Japanese in concentration camps during World War ii, is as cathartic as Antigone.
They also attached infamy to crimes Southern whites felt were more disproportionately committed by blacks (bigamy was considered more of a "black crime," and murder was considered more of a "white crime.