artery

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artery,

blood vessel that conveys blood away from the heartheart,
muscular organ that pumps blood to all parts of the body. The rhythmic beating of the heart is a ceaseless activity, lasting from before birth to the end of life. Anatomy and Function

The human heart is a pear-shaped structure about the size of a fist.
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. Except for the pulmonary artery, which carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs, arteries carry oxygenated blood from the heart to the tissues. The largest arterial trunk is the aortaaorta
, primary artery of the circulatory system in mammals, delivering oxygenated blood to all other arteries except those of the lungs. The human aorta, c.1 in. (2.54 cm) in diameter, originates at the left ventricle of the heart.
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, branches of which divide and subdivide into ever-smaller tubes, or arterioles, until they terminate as minute capillariescapillary
, microscopic blood vessel, smallest unit of the circulatory system. Capillaries form a network of tiny tubes throughout the body, connecting arterioles (smallest arteries) and venules (smallest veins).
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, the latter connecting with the veinsvein,
blood vessel that returns blood to the heart. Except for the pulmonary vein, which carries oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart, veins carry deoxygenated blood. The oxygen-depleted blood passes from the capillaries to the venules (small veins).
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 (see circulatory systemcirculatory system,
group of organs that transport blood and the substances it carries to and from all parts of the body. The circulatory system can be considered as composed of two parts: the systemic circulation, which serves the body as a whole except for the lungs, and the
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). Other important arteries are the subclavian and brachial arteries of the shoulder and arm, the carotid arteries that lead to the head, the coronary arteries that nourish the heart itself, and the iliac and femoral arteries of the abdomen and lower extremities. The walls of the large arteries have three layers: a tough elastic outer coat, a layer of muscular tissue, and a smooth, thin inner coat. Arterial walls expand and contract with each heartbeat, pumping blood throughout the body. The pulsating movement of blood, or pulsepulse,
alternate expansion and contraction of artery walls as heart action varies blood volume within the arteries. Artery walls are elastic. Hence they become distended by increased blood volume during systole, or contraction of the heart.
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, may be felt where the large arteries lie near the body surface.

artery

[′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
A vascular tube that carries blood away from the heart.

artery

any of the tubular thick-walled muscular vessels that convey oxygenated blood from the heart to various parts of the body
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of the nation's top medical centers declined to participate in the randomized trial on the grounds that their cardiologists felt they couldn't ethically leave an infarct-related artery dosed.
The success of the procedure was defined as achieving <20% stenosis of the infarct-related artery, with TIMI III flow after stenting.
The primary end point in CLARITY was a composite comprising an occluded infarct-related artery upon angiography a mean of 3.5 days after starting clopidogrel, repeat MI prior to angiography, or death.
(23) in patients undergoing primary PTCA for AMI that interleukin-6 is released from the myocardium and can be detected in the coronary sinus within minutes after reperfusion of the infarct-related artery. For plasma CRP to become increased, therefore, some time lag is to be expected: cytokine release as a result of tissue damage precedes synthesis and subsequent increases in CRP in plasma after the onset of myocardial damage.
Dilemma in predicting the infarct-related artery in acute inferior myocardial infarction: a case report and review of the literature.
We hypothesized that the ventricular septum had septal perforators from both the right coronary artery (infarct-related artery) and left anterior descending artery, with no flow for more than 24 hours in the septal perforators from the right coronary artery and normal blood flow in perforators from the left anterior descending artery.
In the Ischemic postconditioning group, Infarct-related artery (IRA) was recanalized, blocked by primary balloon angioplasty (PTCA) for 30 s within one minute.
Right radial or femoral access was used for diagnostic angiogram followed by PPCI of the infarct-related artery depending upon the presence or absence of radial artery pulsation.
The goal was to see if the combination of aspirin and warfarin titrated to a target international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.0-3.0 would reduce the reocclusion rate in the infarct-related artery. Reocclusion occurs in 25%-35% of patients within 1 year after successful thrombolytic therapy for acute MI, despite use of aspirin, and increases the risk of reinfarction and mortality.
The balloon remained inflated for 3 minutes in order to increase the time of contact of stem cells with the microcirculation of the infarct-related artery. The coronary artery was re-perfused after every dose of cells for 3 minutes, and therefore the total duration of procedure was about 45-60 minutes.