infectious unit

infectious unit

[in′fek·shəs ‚yü·nət]
(virology)
The smallest number of virus particles that will cause a lytic infection in a susceptible cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
"It proves the principle that a combination of drugs that activate latent virus together with antibodies can induce remission -- at least in a slightly artificial HIV-infected mouse model," stated by Professor Sharon Lewin, head of the infectious unit at The Alfred Hospital according to (http://theconversation.com/shock-and-kill-approach-cures-mice-of-hiv-in-world-first-30528) The Conversation .
In brief, we seeded the soil samples with 1-56 infectious units of contaminated feces; 1 infectious unit was defined as 1 g feces from an SPF duck mixed with 1 x [10.sup.7.8] 50% egg infective dose of HPAI virus (H5N1) particles.
The infected patient was originally admitted to Woodend, but was later transferred to the infectious unit at the Royal.
After a short spell as a community nurse, she returned to the infectious unit until it was transferred to the Royal Liverpool hospital two years ago.
The team demonstrated the use of the model by showing that a commonly used antiretroviral drug combination taken briefly before and after an injection of two million infectious units of stHIV-1 effectively protected the monkeys from the virus.
Our Proof of Inactivation Assay was able to detect 3.0 infectious units after three passages.
William Keevil, director of the Environmental Healthcare Unit in the School of Biological Sciences at Southampton University, says, "My concern is that sonication cavitation may break up prion aggregates, but not destroy the robust priori protein, effectively amplifying the number of infectious units. It is essential, therefore, that someone determines whether the cavitation proposed can actually destroy the prion protein, and not just amplify larger numbers of smaller infectious aggregates."
The two cases of transfusion-associated WNV transmission reported here illustrate that potentially infectious units can escape detection due to very low viremia or other possible mechanisms; for this reason, the risk for transmission has not been eliminated.
But the test's inability to flag all infectious units hints at the presence of an undiscovered causative agent underlying some hepatitis cases, and highlights the difficulties of eliminating the potentially fatal river disease.
Jerry Kolins of the Community Blood Bank of North County Escondido and Poway (Calif.) recently calculated that about 24 infectious units per year would be transfused, while Harvey Sapolsky at Massachusetts Institute of Technology estimated that 18 to 25 cases of transfusion-transmitted AIDS would occur annually.