infest


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infest

[in′fest]
(medicine)
To live on or within the host's body.
References in classic literature ?
To land, it would be necessary to run the U-33 close in to the shore, at least as close as we could, for even these waters were infested, though, not so thickly, by savage reptiles.
But dirt clung to him, and he was infested with fleas.
Cruz and her daughters are finally back in Manila, and said their goal is to not let any of the bedbugs infest their house.
Pantry pests can infest common baking ingredients such as flour, dried fruit, nuts, chocolate and more.
Drywood termites infest drywood structures and do not need contact with the soil.
Maples are the beetles' favorites, but they also can infest birch, ash, elm, horse chestnut, mountain ash, poplar and willow trees.
quintana DNA has been regularly detected in lice collected from the heads of persons living in poverty, but it had not been detected in head lice that infest schoolchildren (7,8).
JEB Editor Michael Dickinson introduced certain group of parasites that can infest brain and control the behavior of its host.
The USDA's Philip Bell warned Wisconsin's Senate environmental and Assembly forestry committees in May that, unchecked, the beetle could infest more than 12,000 communities from Minnesota to North Carolina over the next two decades.
Left unchecked, it can infest and kill whole forests.
I have a question about a fact that was in your story: The statement, "Each year invasive exotic plants infest about 100 million new acres, a land mass about twice the size of Delaware."
Black and red fire ants now infest more than 310 million acres in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Puerto Rico.