Infix

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Related to infixes: affixes, circumfixes

Infix

 

an affix, inserted within the stem in word formation or word inflection. The infix is an important means of affixation in the Indonesian languages, for example: in Tagalog s-um-ulat (“to write”) and s-in-ulat (“was written”) are derived from sulat (“writing”). The so-called nasal infix in Indo-European languages—in Latin, vic-i (“I conquered”) and vi-n-co (“I am conquering”)—is of a more debatable nature, since it does not have a definite meaning. Russian has alternations that originated in the Indo-European nasal infix: Russian lech’—liagu (“to lie”— “I’ll lie”) and sest’—siadu (“to sit”—“I’ll sit”) from Indo-European leg-ti—le-n-g-ō and sed-ti—se-n-d-ō.

References in periodicals archive ?
The function of the two main infixes -c-and -o- is to morphologically link the two constituents and describe the grammatical relations the same as those described in syntactic phrases by genitive
After a brief look at the presence of the two infixes -e- and -o- in the compounds it is convenient now to understand their functions in light of Duranis (2007) observation of compounds with and without infixes.
Durani's (2007) View of Urdu Compounds and the Issue of Infixes
Durani (2007) differentiates the compounds with and without infixes as descriptive and determinative compounds.
He discusses no other uses of infixes in Urdu compounds.
There are thus five functions the two infixes perform.
Example (3) shows the two infixes forming many structural varieties of the Urdu compounds with various semantic interpretations.
Therefore the discussion on this aspect is left to future researchers as the focus of this section is mainly on the morphological functions of the infixes with relevance to semantic expressions that may be given.
It may be that infixes are more likely to develop from prefixes than from suffixes.