inflammability


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inflammability

[in‚flam·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(chemistry)
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From the environmental standpoint, growth of secondary forests contributes to the immobilization of carbon in the atmosphere, the re-establishment of hydrological functions, the recovery of biodiversity, the reduction of potential nutrient losses by erosion and lixiviation, and the decrease in inflammability of the landscape.
Unqualified becoming (378b27 ff.), natural change and destruction (379a10 ff.), concoction and its species: boiling, parboiling and broiling (379a11 ff.), ripening, rawness (379a11 ff.), hardness, softness (381b23 ff.), liquefaction, condensation (382b29 ff.), solidification, melting, thickening, softening (383b17 ff.), the capacity to bend, combustibility, and inflammability (385b6 ff.)--Aristotle traces all theses dispositions to the four fundamental contraries: the hot, the cold, the wet and the dry.
These safety criteria or essential conditions' cover general risks (protection against health risks or physical damage) and particular risks (physical or mechanical, inflammability, chemical properties, electrical properties, hygiene, and radioactivity).
These safety criteria or "essential conditions" cover general risks (protection against health risks or physical damage) and particular risks (physical or mechanical, inflammability, chemical properties, electrical properties, hygiene, and radioactivity).
More than a half of papers on fire-protection wood impregnation was devoted to the effect of impregnation for the flammability, inflammability, and carbonisation rate.
If phlogiston can still be retained as a name for combustible substance (Novalis knows of Lavoisier and oxygen, yet he persists in naming the principle of inflammability phlogiston), that substance appears under contradictory guises: "All dead matter is phlogiston," and, in the next fiery breath, "Phlogiston = spirit," thus drawing perilously close to the conclusion that spirit is dead matter.
EdF is keen on establishing two production chains on the site for processing the sodium (the danger lies in the inflammability of sodium in contact with air and the explosive character of sodium in contact with water) into soda to be incorporated into concrete blocks.
Pneumatic chemistry was introduced by English and Scottish chemists in the late 18th century, and phlogiston, the German name for the principle of inflammability invented by Georg Ernst Stahl (1660-1734), dominated chemistry before Lavoisier.
According to medical friends, old codgers constantly sneak off into these wooden sanctuaries of infallible inflammability to enjoy a sly face tube among the cans of meths and creosote, only to end up celebrating Burns night in their own special way in a&e, with ne'er a bagpipe nor haggis in sight.
(5) The conflict between the "antiphlogistic" system of chemistry, which viewed combustion as a combination with oxygen gas, and its "phlogistic" predecessor and rival, which treated combustion as the release of phlogiston (the principle of inflammability thought to be present in all combustible substances), is usually associated with the names of two scientists, Antoine Lavoisier and Joseph Priestley, who shared the rational and liberal principles of the philosophes.