inflected

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inflected

[in′flek·təd]
(botany)
Curved or bent sharply inward, downward, or toward the axis. Also known as inflexed.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
TiE Inflect (previously TiEcon) is the world's largest conference for entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs with participation from top technology companies, leading venture capital firms, and global services providers.
Inflect has named Josh Neuroth to the role of vice president, product, the company said.
The latter inflected form is the marker of another variety of subjunctive, not a simple preterite tense marker (Anderson 2004a: [section] 3.3), nor a tensed subjunctive.
The building also shifts a degree or two off axis to inflect quietly on the axial force of Diagonal.
Rice argues that in Song of Solomon (1977) Morrison seeks to decry the inability of "traditional forms" such as the Bildungsroman to inflect the distinctiveness of black women's experiences in relation to the experiences of black men.
With these two characters, I began thinking about how the piece could inflect a more local politics having to do with deforestation.
Thus, Christopher Breward's new book on the subject is a welcome contribution to the study of how gender and consumerism inflect one another, and to the process whereby pre-War British men were transformed into a powerful consumer market.
The last time the Lam team saw a similar trend in the first half of 2016, pricing and supply/demand dynamics started to inflect positively by mid-year, adds the analyst.
O'Day successfully employs the feel of current popular dances to inflect ballet, without the Twyla Tharp mannerisms of some of his earlier work.
But why did Dante inflect the Siculo-Tuscan surface of his text with them?
Although Schwartz's essay on voyeurism in Paradise Lost does inflect contemporary film theory with the historicizing context of Galileo and Renaissance optics, and Finucci invokes sumptuary laws in discussing the female masquerade in Ariosto, several of the other essays apparently do not share the editors' interest in historicizing psychoanalysis; rather, their interest is in literary history or the relationship between texts.