inflected


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to inflected: Inflected language

inflected

[in′flek·təd]
(botany)
Curved or bent sharply inward, downward, or toward the axis. Also known as inflexed.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present case, preterite fell is finite, but inflected subjunctive fell is not.
Some educators, however, may be troubled by the overly cautious tone that Greenawalt takes toward a critical examination of religiously inflected issues in the classroom.
The other forms inflected in Standard English, we and they, are fully inflected in Cinema Primitive: "We meet with evil trader now"; "Him make many promises to you"; "They not our friends"; and "We tell them come back tomorrow.
The author's anthropologically inflected close reading of the lives of a cluster of Paulistanos, residents of the Sao Paulo, the capital city of the state of Sao Paulo and South America's largest megalopolis, offers insightful analyses about how those in the middle class define their identity through everyday practices and discourses.
Much of the evidence is intelligently illuminated by astute commentary inflected with psychoanalysis, Bakhtin, and New Historicism.
As the patterns of notes or letters are inflected, moments of fulfillment or stability are perceived.
She points out that Morrison creates a community set upon by "standards, aspirations, and self-valuations" from outside which are not only a result of popular images community members consume, but also the result of the labor relationships and class positions which are inflected by race.
China Southern Airlines will offer those passengers who are confirmed with SARS or suspected SARS inflected passengers to change or postpone their flight at no charge.
Baquba / Nina /--Security source in Diyala said : - Army Aviation inflected a pro-active strikes on armed groups caches northeast of Baquba center of Diyala province today.
And in each instance it inquires into political, economic, and religious factors that conditioned the reading of Mantuan and inflected its appropriation in sixteenth-century England.
Inflected by a generation of scholars who emphasized everything but the social, the argument here tries to reintegrate the cultural with the social.
While Karcher obviously admires Child for these achievements, her admiration does not blind her to more complicated truths: Even though Child could overcome most of the prejudices and racially inflected ideologies of her era, nonetheless, as Karcher makes clear, she "would never succeed in formulating an ideal of human brotherhood that did not involve the absorption of other cultures into her own.