flexibility

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flexibility

[‚flek·sə′bil·əd·ē]
(mechanics)
The quality or state of being able to be flexed or bent repeatedly.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flexibility

The property of a material that allows it to bend without damage (and without losing its strength) and then to return to its original shape.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flexibility

i. An ability of an aircraft or an air force that permits it to be adapted quickly and easily to a variety of different tasks either in a single locality or in a number of localities.
ii. A characteristic of airpower to be used in a wide variety of roles and tasks.
iii. A characteristic of material that allows it to be repeatedly bent within its elastic limits and still return to its original shape each time the external force is removed.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on ACT's applied theoretical model of psychopathology, the core process of change is psychological inflexibility, in which internal experiences (e.g., cognitions, emotions, urges) rigidly control behavior at the expense of more effective and personally valued actions (Hayes et al., 2006).
With regard to the measures of self-control and psychological inflexibility, they were statistically different, as a function of the group of former smokers or relapsed smokers (27.72 vs.
Like so many small sawmills in the British Columbia interior, it became a victim of its own institutional inflexibility, unable to change as the societal realities of the day dictated.
Generali said that the decision is based on the 'the inflexibility of S&P's criteria to take into account the significant improvement of Generali's credit strength achieved over the past two years.'
In the ACT model, psychological inflexibility is considered to be at the core of psychopathology and behavioral ineffectiveness, with empirical evidence showing that it mediates the effects of a wide range of psychological constructs and stressors on psychological symptoms (see reviews in Hayes, Luoma, Bond, Masuda, & Lillis, 2006; Ruiz, 2010).
That kind of relative inflexibility means they need their Op Specs to cut them some slack when the weather is down the tubes.
More cited inflexibility and unwillingness to compromise than anything else - 21 percent overall, including 26 percent of Republicans.
THE COUNCIL of Ministers last week approved yet another bill aimed at bolstering labour market inflexibility. This illiberal bill will give the labour minister the authority to force the application of collective agreements by all businesses in a given sector.
A lack of ability comes from a cat's inflexibility to bend around and be able to groom themselves and this is due to conditions such as spinal arthritis.
2012, p.11], which ends with the sentence, "Love arid acceptance trump inflexibility every time."
His 4-2-3-1 line-ups have abandoned the inflexibility of Roy Hodgson's 4-4-2, but drawn on the strengths of last season's defence.
He also opposed Washington's claims saying that Annan's decision to quit was the outcome of China and Russia's inflexibility discussing the situation in Syria, saying it was rather the U.S.