sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the cyst in this patient formed on the face and also involved the infraorbital sinus, an uncommon presentation for feather cysts, which has not, to our knowledge, been reported previously.
The mass was removed surgically, and histopathologic results determined the mass to be an infraorbital cyst, which formed from the secretory epithelium of the infraorbital sinus. (8) Although the cyst in the cockatoo we describe involved the lining of the infraorbital sinus, it was only partially lined by this secretory epithelium, whereas the cyst in the umbrella cockatoo was completely enclosed within the sinus and lined by its secretory epithelium.
Filling the right infraorbital sinus and extending into the right retrobulbar space, a ~2.5-cm-diameter, minimally heterogeneous, soft tissue-attenuating (pre-HU 30-76), and mildly peripherally contrast-enhancing (post-HU 28-102) mass is present, consistent with keratin cyst (a).
This potentially spread from there into the maxillary and mandibular diverticula of the infraorbital sinus.
Sinus trephination is a procedure that has been described in birds for several years as a method to introduce antimicrobial therapy directly into the local area of infection by accessing regions of the upper respiratory tract that are not reachable with simple flushing, such as the dorsal and caudal portions of the infraorbital sinus or the maxillary diverticulum.
Sterile granulomas were removed via trephination into the maxillary diverticulum of the infraorbital sinus and allowed resolution of the clear nasal discharge.
The abnormalities were consistent with a branchial cyst with carcinoma and cervicocephalic air sac, subcutaneous, and infraorbital sinus metastases.
Histopathologic examination of the infraorbital sinus (Fig 3) revealed a mass composed of polygonal cells with frequent arrangement into tubular and acinar cells, structures indicative of glandular differentiation.
Accessibility to the infraorbital sinus, where the tumor was located in this patient, is limited to an opening of less than 1 mm in most species, via the aperture sinus infraorbitalis.
The differential diagnoses included infectious disease (mycobacteriosis, fungal or bacterial granuloma, poxvirus), hypovitaminosis A-induced abscess or granuloma involving the infraorbital sinus, foreign body reaction, trauma, and infiltrative neoplasia.
Caseous material had invaded the retrobulbar space of the right eye, the right commissure of the beak, and the preorbital diverticulum of the infraorbital sinus and a large cavity remained after debridement (Fig 3).