infrared emission


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infrared emission

[¦in·frə¦red i′mish·ən]
(physics)
The act of emitting infrared waves.
References in periodicals archive ?
This article commemorates Callahan's discovery that insects "smell" pheromones electronically by tuning into their infrared emissions. Callahan's discoveries relate to the ongoing debate over the mechanism of primary olfaction, which has two opposed theories: according to some researchers, the olfactory epithelium reads the shape of odorant molecules; others assert that the electronic or vibratory aspect of the scent molecule is crucial.
Big plumes could temporarily block the planet's infrared emission, explaining the drop to lower temperatures.
If the infrared emission was just from the burst's afterglow, it should have faded away before then.
These bands suggest that ionized water molecules from the rings travel down magnetic field lines into Saturn's ionosphere, where they "quench" a certain infrared emission that otherwise ought to arise.
The dusty part, he said, is interesting because it dominates the infrared emission of active galactic nuclei and can be easily observed.
WD 0806-661 B emits only feeble infrared emission, and none that's been detected at wavelengths shorter than 4.5 microns.
Spitzer can't directly image disks around these stars, but the excess infrared emission it detected around six of these stars indicates that each has a debris disk.
In the course of their observations, the team found unexpected bright infrared emission from methane that stands out on the day side of HD 189733b.
According to his calculations, global infrared emission would be 0.8 watts per square meter higher if all atmospheric ice crystals contained lead compared with none.
Spitzer observed the star over a five-day period and found that its infrared emission (a measure of heat) brightened and dimmed in sync with the planet's orbital motion--a result of the planet showing different hemispheres to Spitzer as it went around the star.