infrared imaging device

infrared imaging device

[¦in·frə¦red ′im·ə·jiŋ di‚vīs]
(engineering)
Any device which converts an invisible infrared image into a visible image.
References in periodicals archive ?
* A new clip-on Thermal Weapon Sight -- a compact, lightweight, all-weather, infrared imaging device that cuts through battlefield obscurants and delivers clear surveillance imagery.
In other words, an infrared imaging device should be considered a precious ally to consult for diagnostics and preventative purposes, for the understanding of complex fluid dynamics phenomena, or for material characterization and procedures assessment which can help improve the design and fabrication of products.
Infrared energy has a slightly longer wavelength than visible light so an infrared imaging device sees differences in the heat energy from the objects in its field of view.
United States (2001), it considered whether a marijuana grower's home had been "searched" under the Fourth Amendment when police, without a warrant, used an infrared imaging device to detect high-intensity plant-growing lamps.
That camera, installed in late 1997 on the 2.5-meter Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma in the Canary Islands, is the largest infrared imaging device ever assembled.
In September, NOAO began allowing visiting scientists to use the experimental setup, called SQUIID (simultaneous quad infrared imaging device).
The helmet has an illuminator, global positioning system and radio antenna suite, image intensifier and infrared imaging device that will send the information into an adjustable head-up display.
On page 14 Adam Taylor from Adiuvo Engineering and Training discusses building embedded infrared imaging devices, while on page 16 Frank Karstens at Basler gives his advice on migrating vision software code from a PC to an embedded system.
has introduced the Fotric 220 Series Thermal Cameras - professional and cost-effective infrared imaging devices that combine state-of-the-art infrared technology with smartphone capabilities.
Advances in manufacturing technology are allowing a new generation of infrared imaging devices to reach the battlefield in record numbers, according to military and industry sources.