infrared laser

infrared laser

[¦in·frə¦red ′lā·zər]
(physics)
A laser which emits infrared radiation, especially in the near- and intermediate-infrared regions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The technique called photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) allowed the researchers to control the robots from outside the body using infrared laser light.
A high-power infrared laser can be used to achieve a very high brightness--in the range of megawatts per square centimetre --on a copper surface when a small spot size is used.
The very large measuring range from 0.01 [micro]m to 2100 [micro]m of the Analysette 22 NanoTec results from the combination of two lasers with two different measuring cell detector spacings: Large particles are detected using an infrared laser with a large distance to the measuring cell, for small particles a green laser with a small distance to the cell is used, which permits the detection of the forward scattered light up to a scattering angle of 65 degrees.
But according to Thomas Fehn, JRUMPF's general manager for additive manufacturing, the infrared laser has a wavelength that is too long for sintering "highly reflective materials such as copper."
When illuminated with an infrared laser, the structure of the nanoparticle collapses from heat and oxygen, which releases the particle's contents.
Pulsed infrared laser action affects only a few microns at the surface of the part; once the rust or surface contamination is vaporized by the laser, the underlying metal reflects the laser IR light harmlessly.
The LADF is a laser ablative dry film, which has been designed for imaging on infrared laser systems.
Researchers and engineers in physical and biological sciences describe laser-produced sub-100 nanometer features, typically produced with femtosecond near infrared laser systems and their technical and biomedical application.
In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team used an infrared laser to cool water by about 36 degrees Fahrenheit -- a major breakthrough in the field.
That, says Trumpf, is because synthetics absorb the energy of the short-wave UV light far better than an infrared laser beam, which may eliminate the need for expensive additives.
coli was used in an in vitro DNA repair assay to evaluate the effect of low-intensity red and infrared laser light.
Using 532nm green laser and 780nm infrared laser, the EasyScan produces images of the inner retina and a deeper view down to the choroid.

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