infringer


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infringer

Pronounced "in-fringe-er." Someone who violates the rights of an individual or organization. Anyone distributing copyrighted material without authorization is an infringer. See copyright.
References in periodicals archive ?
expectation of profit for the infringer (136) and mirrored actual
A trade mark owner can defend a claim under section 21 by successfully proving that the alleged infringer has contravened its trade mark rights, therefore making the threat justified.
Any infringer must answer only to the patent owner and not to the non-exclusive licensees.
If the copyright is registered, the infringer can be fined as much as $150,000 in statutory damages.
of another; (2) whether the infringer, when he knew of the other's
Mr Plaistowe said: "Apart from the considerable costs and time wasted in having to defend a claim, threatening to sue for trade mark, patent or design infringement without first taking expert legal advice could have the effect of enabling the infringer to turn the tables.
While we strongly encourage registering your copyright for many reasons, having a registration might be of little help if your name has been removed (by the infringer or earlier) because you cannot search the Copyright Office for images.
A recent court case in the USA underlines the risks that infringers face.
This is something that's been so overdue, because artists and publishers often can't afford to go after every infringer," he said.
The accused infringer can provide a counter-notification explaining why it is a mistake to remove the material.
Both the patent holder and the alleged infringer, wanting to avoid a patent lawsuit and attorney fees that can cost $100,000 or more, rattle their sabres in hopes of dragging out the process and prompting a settlement.