ingestion


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ingestion

[in′jes·chən]
(biology)
The act or process of taking food and other substances into the animal body.

ingestion

Anything swallowed by an engine, including foreign objects like pebbles, birds, and metal parts. However, the term does not include air.
References in periodicals archive ?
De Jong said he was not aware of any immediate deaths of animals caused by marijuana ingestion, but the toxicity of THC to dogs could cause serious damage.
'Plastic pollution is a major threat to wildlife, not only through microplastic ingestion, but via entanglement and habitat destruAction.
Though meat and vegetable are also believed to contribute to the ingestion of plastic particles in human body, studies are yet to identify their roles due to insufficient data.
Failure to locate the band led to suspicion of ingestion or aspiration of the molar band.
There was also one case of squamous cell carcinoma which presented almost 40 yrs., after ingestion of acid with metastasis and absolute dysphagia for which Feeding jejunostomy was done.
Second sample obtained 2 hours after lithium ingestion showed a range of lithium level from 0.2-1.4meq/ltr.
A's significantly elevated insulin was consistent with normal glipizide effects in a healthy child, while the elevated C-peptide was consistent with insulin being endogenously produced, which ruled out ingestion of her parent's insulin.
Since 1983, the United States Food and Drug Administration has restricted the concentration of camphor allowed in over-the-counter therapeutic products to < 11%, however ingestion by small children of as little as 5 mL of products at this concentration can induce serious toxicity.
The recent victim of fireworks ingestion is a six-year-old male from Tondo, Manila, who swallowed a 'pili cracker.' He is currently admitted at the UP Philippine General Hospital.
'Twenty children had complications following the FB ingestion. Six children had clinically non-significant complications.'
FB ingestion in children may lead to significant morbidity in patients in addition to considerable family anxiety.
Foreign body (FB) ingestion is often perceived to be a common problem in paediatric patients, with reports of ingestion of coins (26.23%), unidentified metal objects (13.11%), bones (8.19%), batteries, and buttons (6.55%).1 However, it is also a problem commonly incurred among adult patients too, with ingestion of fish bones (37.0%), food (19.0%), and metals (18.4%).2 In about 80% of cases, the ingested material passes uneventfully through the gastrointestinal tract; endoscopy is performed in about 20% of cases, and surgery in less than 1%.3 We are reporting a rare case of mesentery involvement after ingestion of a sharp FB, requiring surgical intervention.