ingestion

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ingestion

[in′jes·chən]
(biology)
The act or process of taking food and other substances into the animal body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ingestion

Anything swallowed by an engine, including foreign objects like pebbles, birds, and metal parts. However, the term does not include air.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Foreign body ingestions most frequently involved children between one to three years of age (62 per cent).
In their experience, inexplicable hypoglycemia in a healthy individual who lives in a household with someone who has diabetes is due to ingestion of a hypoglycemic agent until proven otherwise.
For the 4-5 hours between ingestion and the unresponsive episode, the child had been at daycare and staff reported she had been acting normally for her.
FB ingestion in children may lead to significant morbidity in patients in addition to considerable family anxiety.
Material and Methods: Fifty eight children with history of foreign body ingestion were included in the study through non probability purposive sampling technique.
Kane, M.D., from the University of Chicago, and colleagues assessed trends in the rate of PICU admission for opioid-related ingestion over time using billing data from the Pediatric Health Information System (2004 to 2015).
Regarding age and sex distribution, we found that the majority of FB ingestions were in children aged 0-4 years and occurred more among females (54%), who had a slightly higher FB ingestion rate than males in this age group.
The medical records of patients who were followed up on an inpatient or outpatient basis due to WAB ingestion between 2008 and 2017 were evaluated retrospectively.
Accidental foreign body ingestion is a widespread problem in infants and childhood [1].
Ingestion of a FB is common but complications are rare and may include hollow viscous perforation and transmigration.
In addition to the trauma-related burn injuries already discussed, it is important to remember the potential dangers of paraffin ingestion in children, as paraffin is often decanted from cumbersome large containers into smaller cooldrink bottles, placing thirsty and inquisitive toddlers at great risk of exposure.