ingress

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ingress

[′in‚gres]
(astronomy)
The entrance of the moon into the shadow of the earth in an eclipse, of a planet into the disk of the sun, or of a satellite (or its shadow) onto the disk of the parent planet.
(science and technology)
The act of entering, as of air into the lungs or a liquid into an orifice.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Ingress

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Ingress refers to the entry of a planet, one of the luminaries (the Sun or the Moon), or some other celestial body such as an asteroid into a sign of the zodiac. Modern ephemerides (tables of planetary positions) often include information on the exact time one of the planets or one of the luminaries enters a new sign. The term has also been used to refer to the entry of a transiting planet or luminary into a new house.

The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

ingress

To enter hostile territory. The inbound mission to the target after crossing a friendly boundary. The outbound journey from the target is egress.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

ingress

An entrance. Contrast with "egress," which means exit. See ingress traffic. See also Ingres.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
(42) The subject, in breaking the eternal object free from its prior ingression, can value it more or value it less than it had previously been valued, and it does so as a function of its own developing effort to achieve concreteness.
Finally, Beroalde's style encourages the transmutation of topics by ingressions of questions that push self-reflexivity to self-destructive fusion.
(2005) have shown that the mega-playa system of the central Southern Permian Basin has been temporary flooded by marine ingressions. Evaporites are also frequent in central Eurasia (Chuvashov, 1995) and largely developed in the eastern regions such as the Kungurian deposits of the Precaspian basin, Kazakhstan (Barde et al., 2002).