Rorschach Inkblot Test

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Rorschach Inkblot Test

a device, designed by Rorschach (1921), to allow a person to project his/her personality so that problems may be uncovered and resolved. This is therefore a PROJECTIVE TEST, which is based on a holistic, phenomenological approach to understanding personality dynamics.

In practice, the client/patient is shown a series of ink-blot type patterns which are regarded as ambiguous stimuli. The ambiguity allows a variety of different interpretations to be put on them, and features selected from them. The client/ patient is encouraged to talk about what he or she sees in the patterns, and the therapist uses these responses as clues to unconscious or difficult-to-voice concerns which can then be explored. A scoring system has been developed through observations made on various clinical and normal groups, but scoring is still necessarily subjective and interpretation of the responses is regarded as a skilled activity, requiring much experience.

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The pseudo-idiomatic "for inkstands" and the whimsical "cuttlefishing" suggest that ink is in part responsible for this stream of discourse--evidence, I think, that Shem is thinking of or responding to the inkblot tests pioneered by Rorschach.
According to the Independent, he started showing the inkblot paintings to children in order to analyse their wildly varying responses and after years of analysis wrote Psychodiagnostik, a book describing how inkblot tests can be effectively used in psychoanalysis.
This study aims to examine personality characteristics determined by the Rorschach Inkblot test to differentiate between addicts and non-addicts in the context of planning interventions.
7) The Rorschach inkblot test was developed in the 1920s by Hermann Rorschach, a young Swiss psychologist who got the idea from a popular European parlor game that involved making inkblots and telling stories about them.
Ross, the filmmaker, likened Kastner to the Rorschach inkblot test, a psychological evaluation in which patients are asked to interpret inkblot patterns.
Change is such a broad concept that -- like a Rorschach inkblot test -- an individual can read into it what he or she wants.
Projective assessments, such as the Rorschach inkblot test, are used less frequently in the UK.
White writes that she was "almost gleeful when she told me I was a 'borderline psychotic with strong schizophrenic tendencies'" after testing him with the popular Rorschach inkblot test.