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ink,

pigmented fluid used for writing and drawing, or a viscous compound used for printing, both of various colors but most frequently black. The oldest known variety, India ink or China ink, is still used in China and Japan for writing with small brushes instead of pens. All inks are composed of a colorant, a vehicle, a solvent, and additives; the colorant for India ink is carbon black, and the vehicle is water; various substances including glue and gum are used to stabilize suspension. Because of its rich blackness and permanence, India ink is used extensively by architects, engineers, and artists. In many early civilizations dyes obtained from plants, and sepia from the squid, octopus, and cuttlefish, were used as ink. The black and blue-black inks used today, composed of copperas (ferrous sulfate), gallic and tannic acids, and a preservative, were probably known as early as the 2d cent., the acids then being derived from oak or nut galls. Numerous master drawings made with ink containing the acids of gallnuts have been corroded by the ink itself. These inks, and also the colored inks used today, contain aniline and other soluble dyes instead of holding their pigments in suspension; they are accordingly filterable and flow easily even through ball-point pens. Felt-tip markers contain organic compounds in solution. The glutinous inks used by printers owe their various viscosities to such ingredients as linseed oil, synthetics of the alkyd type, mineral oil, and petroleum fractions. This reliance on hydrocarbons has raised concern about pollution, and led to the development of several alternatives: vegetable–based inks; toluene–based inks so that the solvent can be recovered; and water–solvent inks. Marking inks used to mark linen are composed of a salt of silver. Indelible or incorrodible ink is used for writing that is exposed to the weather or to strong acids or alkaline solutions. Fluorescent inks are used in printing maps to be read at night. The liquid in the ink used in newspaper printing is absorbed into the paper, while in many other sorts of ink the liquid evaporates leaving the pigment above the paper surface.

ink

[′iŋk]
(materials)
A dispersion of a pigment or a solution of a dye in a carrier vehicle, yielding a fluid, paste, or powder to be applied to and dried on a substrate; writing, marking, drawing, and printing inks are applied by several methods to paper, metal, plastic, wood, glass, fabric, or other substrate.

ink

a dark brown fluid ejected into the water for self-concealment by an octopus or related mollusc from a gland (ink sac) near the anus
References in periodicals archive ?
Such scenarios can hardly be seen as foundations to a sustainable economy, Inker says.
It will take a lot of good economic news to justify that kind of valuation premium in the medium term," cautioned Inker.
Mr Keenor joined Mr Inker and members of the Supporters' Trust to announce Mr Andrews, who also created the statue of Sir Tasker Watkins which stands outside the Millennium Stadium, as the winner over competing designs by Michael Field and James Done.
Trust member Mr Inker, of Llandaff North, Cardiff, said: "We will approach three local artists with experience of producing excellent sculptures and ask them to put forward their ideas.
Unique to the FPS are independent inker units that slide apart on rails from the plate and blanket cylinder section, allowing automatic de-plating and semi-automatic plate loading).
Mike Inker, who has been with the society for 13 years, said he had never known audiences like it.
It builds on an online petition launched 15 months ago by Bluebirds fan and trust member Mike Inker, of Llandaff North, Cardiff, which already has about 1,100 names on it.
Mike Inker, of the dramatic society, who plays the boatswain, the other half of the comedy double act with the mate, said: "She decided to give it a whirl and between 6pm and 7.
Mr Inker said: "The statue is a long-term project and a site has yet to be decided.
Society spokesman Mike Inker said: "It's really great that Louise and Chris get to do the production together for a second time.
The new towers are Model 80s from Printing Press Services International (PPSI), Preston, England, which in recent years has supplied inker upgrades, press rebuilds, and its own presses to dailies in the United States and Canada.
Below, Julie with youngsters from Team 102 David Lewis, Kayleigh Walters, Emily Inker and Shaun Davies.