ink

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ink,

pigmented fluid used for writing and drawing, or a viscous compound used for printing, both of various colors but most frequently black. The oldest known variety, India ink or China ink, is still used in China and Japan for writing with small brushes instead of pens. All inks are composed of a colorant, a vehicle, a solvent, and additives; the colorant for India ink is carbon black, and the vehicle is water; various substances including glue and gum are used to stabilize suspension. Because of its rich blackness and permanence, India ink is used extensively by architects, engineers, and artists. In many early civilizations dyes obtained from plants, and sepia from the squid, octopus, and cuttlefish, were used as ink. The black and blue-black inks used today, composed of copperas (ferrous sulfate), gallic and tannic acids, and a preservative, were probably known as early as the 2d cent., the acids then being derived from oak or nut galls. Numerous master drawings made with ink containing the acids of gallnuts have been corroded by the ink itself. These inks, and also the colored inks used today, contain aniline and other soluble dyes instead of holding their pigments in suspension; they are accordingly filterable and flow easily even through ball-point pens. Felt-tip markers contain organic compounds in solution. The glutinous inks used by printers owe their various viscosities to such ingredients as linseed oil, synthetics of the alkyd type, mineral oil, and petroleum fractions. This reliance on hydrocarbons has raised concern about pollution, and led to the development of several alternatives: vegetable–based inks; toluene–based inks so that the solvent can be recovered; and water–solvent inks. Marking inks used to mark linen are composed of a salt of silver. Indelible or incorrodible ink is used for writing that is exposed to the weather or to strong acids or alkaline solutions. Fluorescent inks are used in printing maps to be read at night. The liquid in the ink used in newspaper printing is absorbed into the paper, while in many other sorts of ink the liquid evaporates leaving the pigment above the paper surface.

ink

[′iŋk]
(materials)
A dispersion of a pigment or a solution of a dye in a carrier vehicle, yielding a fluid, paste, or powder to be applied to and dried on a substrate; writing, marking, drawing, and printing inks are applied by several methods to paper, metal, plastic, wood, glass, fabric, or other substrate.

ink

a dark brown fluid ejected into the water for self-concealment by an octopus or related mollusc from a gland (ink sac) near the anus
References in periodicals archive ?
And worse, because "there is no stopping damp" "it gets into the inkpot as it gets into the woodwork--sentences swelled, adjectives multiplied, lyrics became epics, and little trifles that had been essays a column long were now encyclopaedias in ten or twenty volumes" (168, emphasis mine).
In the baroque statue, History curbs Kronos' intake by preventing him from completely removing pages from the book of recorded time, and by bringing forth, instead, his own narratives of the past by using the instruments (the book, the inkpot, and the stylus) held in his right hand.
Comic-Con International has bestowed the Inkpot Awards since 1974.
The inkpot at his desk, which has been mischievously turned over in Opitz's scene, is transformed to a pot of blood.
Contributors include Eisner Award-winner Mike Kunkel, Inkpot Award-winner George Gladir, and many more.
He holds a large white open book, and sits at a desk that's cluttered with his pipe, quill pen and inkpot, books and blue-covered pamphlet on Manet, whose title is clearly visible.
Pick up the presentation inkpot on his desk and you'd find it filled with brandy.
I knew I lacked the vital spark for such employment, having witnessed it with some unease in others, but believed I saw it revealed in her fiery dreamlike movements, and thought somehow she might by contagion light such a flame in me, and so in short time found myself front row and center, my poetical quill, as you might say, in hand, her transcendental inkpot in full if fleeting view.
Laughter that turns into a scream of horror when: God's eyelashes Are falling into my inkpot (p.
Later, a favorite prank would be to slip carbide bits into an inkpot.
Thus, whenever I felt the shadow of her wing or the radiance of her halo upon my page, I took up the inkpot and flung it at her" (1979, 59-60).
Martin Luther may never have thrown the inkpot against the devil, but the famous story receives its credence in that he well might have.