inlay

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inlay

1. Dentistry a filling, made of gold, porcelain, etc., inserted into a cavity and held in position by cement
2. Art decoration made by inlaying
3. an inlaid article, surface, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Inlay

A shaped piece of one material embedded in another, usually in the same plane, as part of a surface ornamentation.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inlay

 

the decoration of an object or building (facade or interior) with designs and images made out of small pieces of marble, ceramic, metal, wood, or mother-of-pearl that are set into a surface. The color or material of an inlay distinguish it from the object that it adorns. However, there are some inlays made out of the same material as the decorated surface, such as wood on wood (intarsia), metal on metal, and stone on stone. In the ancient Orient, Greece, and Rome the eyes in statues and busts were inlaid. In principle, the incrustation of concrete panels in modern prefabricated buildings with small pieces of crushed stone is a form of inlay.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

inlay

[′in‚lā]
(graphic arts)
A picture or ornament made by inserting a material such as metal into a space in metal, stone, or wood; the material (such as wire) may be burnished, heated, or fused.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

inlay, intarsia, marquetry

1. A shaped piece of one material embedded in another as part of a surface ornamentation.
2. Such ornamentation as a whole. Also see encaustic tile.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kim runs his workshop and the Lacquerware Inlaid with Mother-of-pearl Experience Center and Succession Hall funded by the Yangju city government there.
Caption: John's Ruger SR 1911 9mm Commander (top) is now attractively dressed with this grip panel with inlaid silver stars by Handmade Grips.
The inlaid dragon is made of African bubinga and Amboyna burlwood.
The inlaid, or so-called encaustic, tile was introduced from France in the first half of the 13th century and continued until the Reformation in the 16th century.
The article can then be incised with an intricate pattern and inlaid with gold, silver or mother-of-pearl.
A REAL BUBBLY DAZZLER: The Saracen Bath is inlaid with hundreds of Swarovski crystals.
A stunningly beautiful 2,000-year-old gold earring inlaid with pearls and precious gems is the latest discovery in Jerusalem's archaeological treasure trove, the City of David.
The volume is heavily illustrated, with many full- and two-page color plates of the inlaid scenes created from semiprecious stones.
Lacquered and inlaid with mother of pearl, the stuff was appreciated by the Victorian bourgeoisie.
A typical circuit is inlaid with batteries, an RFID chip and a printed antenna.
These custom manufactured terminals can incorporate inlaid brazing compounds to facilitate wire attachment in automated processes and reduce labor costs.
In a partnership with AMERICAN FORESTS, the Iowa-based fine furniture company has begun a limited-edition furniture collection inspired by historic period designs and inlaid with wood from trees that are connected to historic events or famous people (www.historicwood.org).