innate

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innate

1. Botany (of anthers) joined to the filament by the base only
2. (in rationalist philosophy) (of ideas) present in the mind before any experience and knowable by pure reason
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

innate

[i′nāt]
(biology)
Pertaining to a natural or inborn character dependent on genetic constitution.
(botany)
Positioned at the apex of a supporting structure.
(mycology)
Embedded in, especially of an organ such as the fruiting body embedded in the thallus of some fungi.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two participants explicitly negated the idea of innateness in LA.
Approaching archetypes: reconsidering innateness. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 55, 502-521.
(2) The simultaneous emergence of different aspects of a whole system also provides indirect evidence for the innateness of the input analyzers and computational machinery that constitute core cognition...
He notes first that if one were to abide by the marks of religious common notions that Lord Herbert actually employs, there would perhaps be hundreds more since none of the five religious common notions that he mentions have the six qualifying characteristics of innateness that he discusses.
Therefore, besides religious concepts, the notion of innateness can be well applied to almost all situations.
Herdt states that "the traits of biological innateness, sexual exclusivity of erotic behavior, lifelong adherence to same-gender relations ...
He focuses on the hows and whys of music in human life, rather than analysis and criticism, and provides short chapters on the challenges of writing about music; the difficulties in defining it; evolutionary theories of its origins; the innateness of music in humanity; the impression of character in musical works; the shape of musical patterns; the transience of music; its relationship to language; music in the natural world; folk and art music; music consumption; creativity; music-making; the mind and musical perception; listening preferences; music and identity; prejudice and tolerance in musical choices; religious interpretations of music; and music as a spiritual conduit.
However, the nature of the "innateness" of this characteristic may be interpreted differently.
The contours of these masculinities change over time, being affected by changes elsewhere in society and at the same time, themselves affecting society itself." Because of this, masculinity should not be seen as "a psychological innateness of the social self (the Freudian or Jungian model) or a product of functional and largely static sex roles" (Whitehead 89).
Without such a critical theory EE maintains the assumptions and taken-for-granted beliefs that current global environmental conditions exist due to the natural order of things and the innateness of "human nature".