benign

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benign

Pathol (of a tumour, etc.) not threatening to life or health; not malignant

benign

[bə′nīn]
(medicine)
Of no danger to life or health.
References in classic literature ?
I do not think the innocent kitten can be guilty, and surely it is unkind to accuse a luncheon of being a murder.
It seemed to become personally important to myself that the truth should be discovered and that no innocent people should be suspected, for suspicion, once run wild, might run wilder.
Paper him, as ye call it, set the hunt on him; and let honest, innocent folk show their faces in safety." But at this both Alan and James cried out in horror; bidding me hold my tongue, for that was not to be thought of; and asking me what the Camerons would think?
But whether innocent or guilty, your trial begins to-morrow, and the day after you will be condemned.
Did not this mute tryst betray the secret of her innocent soul?
In every gallery in Europe there are hideous pictures of blood, carnage, oozing brains, putrefaction--pictures portraying intolerable suffering--pictures alive with every conceivable horror, wrought out in dreadful detail--and similar pictures are being put on the canvas every day and publicly exhibited--without a growl from anybody--for they are innocent, they are inoffensive, being works of art.
Murderous minstrel, instrument of evil, most innocent instrument!
But I trust that, in the worst case, we may obtain a pardon for the sake of the innocent who are involved."
Suspicious circumstances swarmed upon my slow perception: how innocent I had been!
If there is not evidence enough, on the one hand, to justify them in finding a prisoner guilty, and not evidence enough, on the other hand, to thoroughly convince them that a prisoner is innocent, they extricate themselves from the difficulty by finding a verdict of Not Proven."
These calumnies might have probably produced ill consequences, at the least might have occasioned some trouble, to a person of a more doubtful and suspicious character than Mr Allworthy was blessed with; but in his case they had no such effect; and, being heartily despised by him, they served only to afford an innocent amusement to the good gossips of the neighbourhood.
"In this matter of the Diamond," he said, "the characters of innocent people have suffered under suspicion already--as you know.