inorganic peroxide

inorganic peroxide

[¦in·ȯr¦gan·ik pə′räk‚sīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
An inorganic compound containing an element at its highest state of oxidation (such as perchloric acid, HClO4), or having the peroxy group, ‒O‒O‒ (such as perchromic acid, H3CrO8·2H2O).
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The particle size distribution of the inorganic peroxide was measured based on the formulated liquid paints.
For the former, clotting of the pores would limit the release rate during water immersion; and for the latter, the alkaline products developed during the reaction between water and the inorganic peroxide would increase the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.
Antifouling based on inorganic peroxides has previously been described in two Japanese patents dating back to 1988 (3) and 1989.
Hydrogen peroxide can be generated by enzymatic reactions(7) or photo-catalytic reactions,(8) or it can be a product of a reaction between water and a suitable precusor compound such as inorganic peroxides.
The reaction between inorganic peroxides and water yields hydrogen peroxide, molecular oxygen, or a combination thereof.
Table 1: Selected inorganic peroxides, their safety related issues and use in modern industry Compound/formula Safety issues Uses Strontium peroxide Powerful irritant Pyrotochnics Sr[O.
However, because hydrogen peroside is the compound intended to actively hinder fouling, we believe that hydrogen peroxide is the prime "biocide" and should therefore be registered if inorganic peroxides are intended for use in antifouling coatings.
The aim of this work has been to determine the potential of inorganic peroxides as active antifouling coating ingredients.
Water induces the reaction of the inorganic pigments in the can, therefore only solvent-based coatings were considered for the inorganic peroxides, and limited resources and space on the test facilities limited the number of coatings included in the test series.
The experimental pigments were tested for coating compatibility, and formulated coatings were used to determine the performance of the inorganic peroxides in antifouling coatings in general.
The following is a list of the experiments performed to establish the coating compatibility and antifouling performance of the inorganic peroxides.
The reaction between inorganic peroxides and water tends to result in oxygen as well as hydrogen peroxide.