input program


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input program

[′in‚pu̇t ‚prō·grəm]
(computer science)
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Given a query, the Magic Sets technique rewrites the input program to identify a subset of the program instantiation which is sufficient for answering the query.
For applications in which termination needs to be guaranteed a priori, the ASP grounders can make use of a preprocessor implementing a decidable check, which allows the user to statically recognize whether the input program belongs to a smaller subclass of the finitely ground programs (Syrjanen 2001; Gebser, Schaub, and Thiele 2007; Lierler and Lifschitz 2009; Calimeri et al.
It starts its computation by forming completion of an input program. Then Cmodels calls a SAT solver for enumerating models of program's completion.
Just as Cmodels or ASSAT, it starts its computation by forming the clausified completion of an input program. Next it implements a search procedure that relies on a unit propagator stemming from SAT on the program's completion and an Unfounded propagator stemming from native answer set solvers.
This family relies on a translation of propositional logic programs into logic formulas so that models of the resulting formula are in one-to-one correspondence with the answer sets of the input program. This translation may add auxiliary atoms in the process and may include the normalization of aggregates as well as the encoding of level mappings for nontight problem instances.
Continuous speech input programs generally take large amounts of computer power, and the requirements have tended to increase dramatically every time a program is upgraded.
There are no speech input programs at present specifically designed for individuals with significant speech disabilities, although DragonDictate tends to work better than continuous speech programs for these people.
Those are the expectations of Michael Noll, program coordinator of automated data input programs for the Department of Defense.
The following section describes strategies for accommodating users with: (1) visual impairments by using a glare protection screen, a large monitor with high resolution, magnified display of computer screen, large print production, keyboard orientation aids, speech synthesizer, screen reader software, braille printer, and speech recognition system; (2) hearing impairments by using amplification devices, captioning, signaling system, TDD, and electronic mail; and (3) mobility impairments by using sequential keystroke input programs, key repeat rate control, keyboard macros, word prediction packages, speech recognition, robotic devices, mouse alternatives, optical character recognition, phone headset, and speed dialing.