inquiline

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inquiline

[′in·kwə‚līn]
(zoology)
An animal that inhabits the nest of another species.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The major nomenclature problem appears to focus around the term "inquilinism." Historically, all organisms associated with galls that were not predators or parasitoids were placed in this guild (Redfern & Askew 1992).
As well-characterized as they are in the literature, the designation of inquilinism in thrips does not fit the broad characterization suggested here.
Patterns of kleptoparasitism and inquilinism in social and non-social Dunatothrips on Australian Acacia.
Errard, "Bumblebee inquilinism in Bombus (Fernaldaepsithyrus) sylvestris (Hymenoptera, Apidae): behavioural and chemical analyses of host-parasite interactions," Apidologie, vol.
For some species the inquilinism here observed seems to be facultative, because in the vicinity, and during the same period, nests of T.
In a recent cladistic analysis of the evolution of inquilinism in gall wasps, Ronquist (1994) attempted to eliminate the influence of convergence by removing all putative apomorphies shared by hosts but not by parasites.
Cynipid inquilinism can be viewed as a form of parasitism, in which the inquilines take advantage of other species' ability to form galls.
Cynipid inquilinism is an example of the latter type of parasitism, here termed agastoparasitism (from Greek agastor, near kinsman).
These workers thus argue for a single transition from gall forming to inquilinism, and subsequent radiation of the inquiries to exploit different host galls.
However, egg-laying by workers should not be assumed to preclude the evolution of workerless inquilinism. If the queen option has a relatively high success rate, even a facultatively-reproductive worker caste may be evolutionarily unstable.
However, workerless inquilinism is the only parasitic syndrome that is likely to be stable if a parasite's free-living ancestors had obligately sterile workers.