inscribe

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inscribe

[in′skrīb]
(computer science)
To rewrite data on a document in a form which can be read by an optical or magnetic ink character recognition machine.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the inscriber catinates mastery's initials onto the site of enunciation, I argue, an alternative presence in the slave signature emerges to produce in the spatial arrangement in the pot shown above a contest of signatorial authority.
The person using the vibrating inscriber must also return it.
Against the "map" of Cambridge life, with its summary recounting of past habits and indolent contentedness, Wordsworth posits an inscriptional mode--and a possible poetics--that transforms the feelings of the inscriber.
The equipment provided by Harris for each of the HD studios includes Platinum routers, Inscriber G-Series graphics products, Videotek TVM test and measurement devices and Nexio servers, Predator II or Predator II-GX multiviewers, a range of core processing technology including up/down/cross converters and multiplexers/demultiplexers, and Velocity ESX news, sports and production editing systems, he added.
The belated witness, Ursa, is thus not a plot designer, an inscriber of a planned tale.
41) The container and inscriber of this expressiveness is the material body as it represents the locus of personhood.
Perhaps because of the mace's dominance, or perhaps on a whim, the inscriber here indicated his ownership by placing his name before rather than after the verb.
inscriber of glosses should not blind his native audience or any
While "as regards the Judge Pyncheon of to-day, neither clergyman, nor legal critic, nor inscriber of tombstones, nor historian of general or local politics, would venture a word against this eminent person's sincerity as a christian, or respectability as a man, or integrity as a judge, or courage and faithfulness as the often-tried representative of his political party," the narrator reveals that "tradition affirmed that the Puritan had been greedy of wealth" and "the Judge, too, with all the show of liberal expenditure, was said to be as closed-fisted as if his gripe were of iron" (House 122).
The one with the moustache wears a small ring on his little finger, and the inscriber of "Sacred to the Memory of Friendship" had also "pasted on a prescription from F.
11) corresponding derision or surprise, much less indignation; and still less, to all appearances, did it gain for the inscriber the repute of being a simpleton.
He cites only himself in the epigraphs as the authorizing inscriber, thereby suggesting again via metatextual commentary that he is an isolated figure whose book is precariously situated outside the realm of others' discourses.