insect repellent

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Related to insect repellant: Mosquito repellent

insect repellent,

substance applied to the skin in order to provide protection against biting insects, primarily mosquitoes, ticks, chiggers, fleas, and certain flies. The most effective such substance is DEETDEET
or N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide,
C12H17ON, nearly odorless, colorless to clear yellow oily liquid that boils at 111°C;. DEET was developed by the U.S.
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 (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide), which blocks insect odor receptors for several compounds in human sweat. DEET is a common ingredient in many commercially available insect repellents; picaridin is also effective. Citronella oil, eucalyptus oil, soybean oil, and other substances also repel biting insects, although they are typically effective for a much shorter period of time than DEET is. Permethrin, a persistent contact insecticide that is poorly absorbed by humans, is used to treat clothing, bedding, and the like to protect against mosquitoes and ticks. The use of insect repellents is often recommended in certain locales because it reduces the likelihood of acquiring malaria, Lyme disease, and other infections spread by biting insects. Repellents do not protect against bees and other stinging insects.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sterns: Sunscreen and insect repellant, towelettes, hard or gummy candies, chewing gum, flavor packets for water, energy bars, nuts, toothbrushes, toothpaste and skin lotions.
Two other agents that are effective insect repellants are picaridin (the active ingredient in Cutter Advance) and oil of lemon eucalyptus.
Greensboro, NC-based Buzz Off Insect Shield LLC's Insect Repellant Apparel uses permethrin, a synthetic version of a repellent that occurs naturally in chrysanthemums, which is tightly bound into the garment, creating an invisible and odorless protective barrier around the wearer.