Insert

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insert

[′in‚sərt]
(metallurgy)
The part of a die or mold that can be removed.
A part, usually metal, which is placed in a mold and appears as an integral part of the final casting. Also known as bowl.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Insert

 

the part of a sliding bearing that directly supports the journal of a rotating shaft or axle. An ordinary split bearing has two inserts, which are the halves of a hollow cylinder. Less frequently, three or more inserts are made in a bearing.

The material of the insert that comes in contact with the shaft’s journal should have a low coefficient of friction, good run-in qualities, and low wear of both itself and the journal. These requirements are met by antifriction alloys—special metal-ceramic and nonmetallic materials such as textolite, cured rubber, and wood. Thin-walled inserts stamped out of steel strip 1.5-2.5 mm thick and covered on one side with a thin layer of antifriction alloy are commonly used in internal-combustion engines of transportation vehicles. Such inserts, in addition to using a small amount of expensive material, are reliable and considerably simplify machine repair.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

insert

1. A nonstructural repair to correct an appearance defect in laminated timber.
2. An inlay of wood veneer, a patch, or a plug used to fill holes in plywood.
3.See patch, 2.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In some shops, he says, inserting time can be reduced by two-thirds.
As a one-man operation, Kirk says, "I have to, out of necessity, streamline things." Kirk does have help in the person of Lealand Bruce, who can make fast work of inserting using the Insert Buddy.
Manual inserting is typically accomplished from a stack of papers in which the top copy is lifted up to open the pocket sideways and insert the ad flier.
The reason for the difference, Lavery says, is inserting. In Canada, inserts generate less than 10% of advertising revenue, says Gary Masters, marketing vice president of the Canadian Newspaper Association.
Other papers with space constraints have set up inserting and packaging operations separated from their printing presses.
Papers that have space--such as the New York Times at its $450 million plant in Edison, N.J.-- combine printing and inserting in one place.